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Search Results 100 to 125 of about 126 (some duplicates have been removed)
a 90-year-old san francisco institution that i'd like to commend today, and cynthia huey is here from the clement street merchants association, if she could come forward. i'm just very proud to work so closely with the clement street merchant association celebrating their 90th year this year. it's an organization that's been working hard to revitalize the richmond district, especially in the past few months as new leadership has emerged. the clement merchants association represents diverse businesses from a variety of cultural backgrounds that makes clement street stand out from other commercial districts. it's one of the most diverse places. i moved there in 1984 to second avenue and clement. it was considered the new chinatown but it's so much more than that. it's a gateway for many different types of newcomers but also businesses. this year, the clement street merchants celebrate their 90th year of outstanding service to the small business community to the whole city. and the roster is growing of many different businesses from cynthia huey's feed store, a great vintage clothing sto
appreciate the comments made by many in the audience of san francisco's uniqueness and our diverse culture but especially our respect for personal freedoms. i also have concerns similar to supervisor campos' that this may be an issue that's about one neighborhood, and mostly about one plaza, and i really don't think we need citywide legislation, especially overbroad legislation to deal with an isolated what i would call an isolated community incident. and i think this legislation also, as supervisor olague said, is not good use of our time and i will be voting no on it as well. >> president chiu: is there further discussion? supervisor wiener. >> supervisor wiener: thank you. thank you arbitration colleagues, for your comments. i just want to make a few points. first of all -- and some of the points i've heard today are some that some of the opposite have raised as well. to suggest this is not important enough or worthy of our time i did a little research and we could go back and i could probably find some resolutions and ordinances from pretty much every member of this body, that would --
please. >> good evening, supervisors. i'm elizabeth stampe, executive director of walk san francisco. and i'm here to encourage you to reject this appeal and affirm the planning department's decision to get these improvements happening as soon as possible on fell and oak, to calm traffic, and improve safety. these include 12 new bulbouts as you've heard, a shortened crossing district distance and increased visibility, and add new street greening. the traffic signals will be adjusted for lower speeds, safer speeds. these are important fixes to make some of the highest speed streets in our city closest to our most beloved park more safe for people walking. it clearly -- this project clearly falls into a categorical exemption from a full environmental review. it is clearly minor. and a reversal of the exemption would really set a bad precedent, forcing full reviews on traffic calming projects, even small scale fixes like bulbouts as well as other sustainable design improvements. a reversal would delay not only these current improvements that are much-needed as the previous speaker said
that is near and dear to me. i'm 57 years old and i'm born and raise the right here in san francisco, you know. >> so how do you think then that we can increase foot traffic from the --. >> by opening up the doors for the people that live there. you got 1300, you got almost 2 million dollars and you got a club there you can't even tell it's a club. you got people standing there and doing all this money back and forth from japan and nobody goes on the street and says open the doors. here's the saddest thing i've ever seen in my life. >> everybody only gets two minutes. if you could finish your thought, that would be great. >> two minutes? i've been here 57 years, lady. you say valley will be here monday and people are out sick. you are not respecting the sbreg integrity of the folks already there. maybe you ought to just stop and let us grow and flow. >> thank you, next speaker. >> good afternoon, supervisors, my name is jake crafford. if you look at the fillmore district and compare it to divisidero and vezation valley, you are having a lot of power shaping our neighborhood deciding wha
unacceptable to have the level of achievement gap that we have in san francisco. and even though money and resources is not the be-all, end-all it is part of the equation, it is part of the answer. it reality is -- and i say this as someone who worked at the school district for many years -- that there is only so much that the administration, that our teachers can do, that our parents can do, without those resources. and so that's why i think this is important, and this is important now. because i do think that we have a crisis. and the thing about the achievement gap and the low performance of some of these kids is that we also know that the™jpkñ gap becomes. and that, you know, to the extent that you wait six months, you wait a year, however the wait might be, that to have the impact then that you can have today, you probably will end up having to spend more money. and so that's why i believe that the sooner that we can act,ropíq better. so thank you again to everyone who's worked on this. >> president chiu: supervisor kim. >> supervisor kim: thank you. i just want to clari
spend more than we do on per people spending. in response to this in 2004 san francisco voters passed a measure to counter this. parents knew that although we were once first in the country in our public school system, not just k-12 but also higher education that we were neveris% going back there. so parents put on the ballot a measure called proposition h so we could ask the city to spend a morgs of our tax dollars to enrich our public schools. i know as a policy set asides are a controversial issue and agree they tie hands of legislators and city officials in how to prioritize budgetary dollars but we heard affirmative support from voters saying they of those dollars will go into our public schools, starting at 10 million and going up to 60 million. as a school board member i try to visit all of our schools and i visit schools almost once a week during the school year. and i can't tell you what an incredible impact proposition h has made in our schools. you actually see libraries in elementary schools, that hadn't been open in years, they didn't have librarians to put books in their
afternoon commissioners. i am the chair of the coalition for san francisco neighborhoods planning and land use committee. we are very concerned that this was set up very dangerous precedence regarding the approval process. this project was denied twice before. and should have 12-month waiting period. and here it's only been three months and it's up for approval again. and we think this is a bad, bad precedent. as far as this project should be coming up in 12 months, not three months. other thing is that we find it somewhat distressing that the federal judge is going to impose their will and save them time and force the city to go back or disregard city policy and process. we think that should not occur. an historic resource is been planed for destruction/demolition and if this should occur, there should be a significant community benefit. and the commission, i believe, commissioner wu has stated that the community benefit is not there. and it seems like this new project will not allow it to happen. there are plans for senior housing, senior affordable housing, which the city drastically ne
. they are one of my top priorities. even when you look at our prison system for example, just in san francisco county jail alone 75% of inmates didn't graduate from high school. like what can we do to prevent that number from increasing. it's to graduate our kids from high school. this 800,000 is not a lot. it's modest for what we're trying to do. it will help enrichment programs to keep our kids in school. and the other thing i'll say is in regards to our school district, over the last few years, for the first time in over a decade, the school district has actually been reversing the widening achievement gap. and i forget what year it started but since roughly about five years ago the school district has narrowed the the achievement gap every year. and previous to that it had only widened every year meaning the gap between african-american, pacific islander and latino students versus white and asian-american students. now we are finally narrowing that gap so district is on trap, we're doing the work we need to do. this small amount of money will help the school district do the work that it's
that for the city and county of san francisco. so thank you. the director of women inc and we are a agency in the mission and thank you so much for your leadership on this issue. as you will see, in the family violence council. family violence is the number one reported crime in san francisco unfortunately and we will echo our hope for a workplace policy on domestic violence and we spoke about the positive impact that that could have not only for the survivors of domestic violence but for the co-workers and supervisor and everyone in the surrounding area at the workplace. something that i think is important to add, is that many of our clients come to us you know, they have been in these relationships that are abusive for some time. and many times we are one of the last calls out that they make. and they lean on the support of family, friends and in a lot of cases, people that are in their workplace for some support, some options. and someone to lean on, unfortunately is what we have heard is that many times the response is that they were greeted with were not productive or posive. and i th
, commissioners. i hope that this house will be built soon. i work in san francisco. and i pass by this property all the time because my church is in sunset, and also i have -- because i'm an insurance agent, so i drive around the neighborhood to take pictures of the houses. it seems this house has been vacant for so long it's an eyesore. when i pass by this house it caught my attention because it does not look good. and from the insurance agent's point of view that all the vacant houses, it has the intention to draw the squatters and interviewedders. and they -- intruders and they may go into vacant homes to do illegal activities. we hope this nice home, when i look at the pictures, it seems that it is conformed to the neighborhood and i hope that this project will be built soon so that it will not throw the bad people into the neighborhood. i feel that this nice project can improve and upgrade the whole neighborhood. thank you. >> president fong: thank you. is there any additional public comment? >> good afternoon, commissioners. my name is john waldchuck, trustee of the trust that owns the ho
. essentially that china town is the densest in san francisco, the most open space poor, as you often hear in our conversations here, and that the analysis the planning department did indicated much of the spillover from increased density created by the new housing and new office space in the plan area would affect not just the downtown and south of market by china town. what is before you today is affirming and supporting what the planning commission did on october 18th. to prioritize spending those impact fees in the china town neighborhood. i want to note quickly the ipic committee on which the rec department has a seat is body charged with the actually allocation of those fees. i believe we talked a little about that in the september hearing but happy to answer more questions on that, as necessary. >> is there any public comment on this item? please come forward. >> good morning, aim may chan. i'm a legislative advisor for david chu. i want to express our support for resolution before you that prioritizes impact fee revenues from the transbay improvements in china town. the china town
the country as well as san francisco. i'm -- you know what i do for a living. i'm a homeless advocate. i advocate for homeless people and clifford hoosier has been coming to my center for two years now and a immigrant from sierra leon. if he returns to his home he will be killed. he is requesting asylum here in san francisco. he hasn't gotten s he is not here illegal. he's a harvard graduate as well. next year january 31 and i just been coming to city hall to try to get support for him as well, and that's pretty much all i have to sai. i would like him to speak for himself. >> i want to thank the commission for its work. this is my second time appearing at city hall. the first time i had the opportunity again to witness a session like this, and i want to thank everybody. i want to thank supervisor olague. i have read much about the commission work from the examiner, the san francisco examiner. like jamal and my case manager. i see supervisor mar and supervisor campos and i have been reading about san francisco and all about its developments on the san francisco examiner which a
Search Results 100 to 125 of about 126 (some duplicates have been removed)